How children used devices, apps and media in 2013

 

 

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Common Sense Media’s infographic on children’s daily screen time and app use. Graphic: Common Sense Media

From: http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2013/oct/31/digital-kids-devices-apps-media

“It notes a big spike in tablet ownership for US families in the last two years: “Among families with children eight and under, there has been a five-fold increase in ownership of tablets (from 8% to 40%), and the percent of children with access to some sort of smart mobile device at home has jumped from half (52%) to three-quarters (75%).”

The research has also made headlines for its finding that 38% of children under two years old have used a mobile device, up from 10% in 2011″

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Time waits for nobody

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Oh craziness.

Having so much fun, but where does the time go?

Luckily a more experienced comrade reminded me that i’m currently “in the tunnel”. And it will pass. Three youngsters 5 and under, new business, and the “big baby” aka hubby. Its ok to feel this way.

I shall write again.I shall write again.I shall write again.I shall write again. 

Writing, i miss you.

See you soon

xx

 

Then and now. The Great Divide of having children.

I used to have a decent fruit bowl, now I have fruit pocked with teeth marks.

I used to have a desk drawer stocked with stationary, now I have bits of prestik sticking to things, disassembled pen springs, empty sticky tape, missing scissors, and dry highlighters.

I used to have clean windows, now they have scribbles done in body lotion, sunscreen, or toothpaste.  The same applies to curtains. Children use curtains as we would use napkins, towels, and tissues.

I used to have a sundowner at sunset, now I feed babies and walk them up and down or read them stories.

I used to be selfish, now I am unselfish

I used to be impatient, now I am patient

I used to be intolerant, now I am accepting

I smile at the bitten fruit, because it means my children are eating fruit.

Pen-springs in my drawer remind me that my children are inquisitive and smart as can be.

And scribbles on the windows are proof that I have little-people in my life that fill my heart with love.  And according to me, love is what makes the world go around and makes life worth living.     

I thank my fruit bowl, my desk drawer and my windows for the lessons they have taught me.

Mont-Marie Restaurant

Another wonderful child-friendly spot in Stellenbosch to add to our world-class repertoire. 

Mont-Marie is situated on the Blaauwklippen Road off the R44. A wooden deck overlooks the farm dam and a fenced-in lawn sports three jungle gyms. My daughter could ride her little scooter around the level playing area, and is a separate bicycle track can host older children. There is no sandpit and no trampoline.

The lunch menu includes light meals priced for “locals” and has a kiddie section. Dinners are more fancy and reflect the chef, Pieter Vlok’s, previous experience at Overture and Rust and Vrede. The wine is deliciously light and the mountain-views are spectacular. 

A perfect spot for breakfast with the kids, lunch with the family, wowing foreign visitors, or a romantic sundowner.

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Visit the country more often

Note to self:

Visit the country more often.

Get in the car.

And go.

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Saturday morning and we spontaneously throw a few bits and bobs in the boot, buckle in all the children and hit the road.

To the north lie snow-covered mountains. East, the worlds longest wine route and South, the beach. We’re still undecided.

We stumble upon an open-air ‘living’ museum, which proves to be a big hit. All we need for a perfect morning is a big blue tractor, a couple of ducklings, and the shade of a lovely big karee tree. 

We can’t resist pulling over to click the Nikon a few times along the Route 62, before we meander into an art deco style country hotel.  The country air smells sweet. The deserted streets are safe for toddlers to run amuck, and the locals have smiles on their faces. Ah, The Serenity… except for the over-excited city kids vocally indulging in their new found freedom.

Sipping wine under a starry sky was a moment I sucked in deeply and now still recall fondly. And waking to birdsong was glorious. 

The monotony of the home routine had been broken. The coziness was comforting.  And so, I am reminded that less is more. Hit the road and be spontaneous. Leave all the paraphernalia. Just be together, laugh and breathe in the sweet air.

All the planning, packing, and preconceived expectations are for the birds!

Happy road-tripping.

Xx

Finding the ‘new normal’ with an infant

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Finding the ‘new normal’ with an infant 

Until the moment the baby arrives everything is completely normal.

You know your life is about to change dramatically, but it doesn’t change until the actual moment of the birth. You can hardly prepare and you can barely picture it. There is no easing into it slowly…

The arrival is inevitably accompanied by discomfort, be it the sunroof variety or the more natural kind. Neither comes without a certain amount of pain. But the pain does not end there.

It is followed by the feeding. Almost immediately. Your body takes one battering and exchanges it for another. And it’s on going. Every three hours. Tick tock. Tick tock. Every day. Every night.

Revered silence breaks into insatiable screaming, calling for immediate attention at any time. During the day or night, during a meal or a nap. There. Is. No. break.

The good news is that it is temporary. The shared moments of wakefulness become more interactive. The feeds become more conveniently spaced and the miracle of life is overwhelming.

Holding someone so small, so warm and so vulnerable is beyond description. That someone so perfect can develop from a mere seed is beyond comprehension.

SO bring it on. Infant bootcamp 101 is a small price to pay for a make-or-break-experience. It’s the end of life as you know it. You better strap on your in-the-mood-for-something-new attitude. Go with the flow, cancel all plans and delete all expectations.

And you will fly into the ‘new normal’.